Freelance Marketplace Connects Business Owners to Process Automation Experts

Workload – a San Francisco Bay Area startup – has recently seen a major uptick in user growth since launching its freelancing marketplace. Workload matches businesses to process automation experts – folks who can quickly and cheaply take a manual business process and automate it using readily available tools on the internet. 

New technologies that have only become available in the last five years or so are opening the door for another “wave of automation” that will impact many small businesses similar to how industrial automation in manufacturing occurred many years ago.

A business owner can now describe the workflow they want automated and, within minutes, a qualified expert will be matched to them with a proposal to completely automate the job. While most small and growing businesses keep doing things the inefficient old-fashioned way, Workload’s experts figure out how to automate their tasks (which most small business owners DON’T want to deal with) and leave them with the capacity to scale more important areas, like sales. The best part: once the workflow is automated, the client gets continued use out of it long after the expert has left the engagement. There is no recurring fee.

Although Upwork could be considered a similar platform, they have such a wide range of offerings it is hard to tell what they specialize in. There is no “go-to” place on the internet to get business processes automated. Workload is the best at exactly that. Workload has a process of screening each freelancer to ensure their identify is verified and they have the skills they claim. This is a necessary step to be considered an automation expert before they can start performing any client work.

Workload’s co-founder and CEO Bryan Golkhajeh states, “Companies in the automation space are more focused on automation TOOLS rather than automation SERVICES. It’s great that we now have easy-to-use tools for automating tasks (like Zapier and Integromat), however, those tools are built for developers and ‘quasi-developers.’ Your neighborhood law firm that makes several million in annual revenue isn’t going to learn it. They would rather pay someone to do it for them. This is the target customer we are servicing.”